Fable Legends Gameplay- Recorded From An E3 Show Floor Screen

This video shows some of the gameplay from Fable Legends from the E3 show floor- its been recorded off of a monitor so the quality is bad but you get to see more of what the game is like- just imagine it looking and sounding 100x better 🙂

(This isn’t the whole level, it stops about 1/2 way through)

Fable Legends Previews

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Here are some of the early reviews from people who have played the game at E3:

GameSpot:

Lionhead’s upcoming Fable Legends is letting you take on the role of the villain as well as the hero. I’ll confess that I’m not the biggest Fable fan out there, but its Villain mode is a very different beast to the traditional Fable fare. That’s not to say its regular third-person combat isn’t enjoyable. Indeed, playing as the ranged character Rook, I had some fun taking on monsters with his ranged arrow attacks, and blowing them up with his explosive bolt ability while trying to co-ordinate with my co-op chums…

This is the most impressed I’ve been with a Fable game in ages, and I’ll certainly be hitting up Xbox Live when the multiplayer beta launches on the Xbox One this holiday.

 

8cnTV:

 Personally, Fable Legends was not only one of the best surprises of E3 for me so far, it was also, hands down, one of the most fun experiences…

I wandered in with my team, making note of the huge amount of games being represented before I randomly selected the upcoming multiplayer title as our first victim of the day.  My expectations weren’t especially lofty, but I soon found myself enjoying myself almost too much, even though I was getting slaughtered without mercy (by a coworker no less!)…

The game was a great start to the day. It was new, it was fun, it was invigorating, it was challenging; and regardless of the inevitable loss screen, I can’t wait for the rematch.

 

Kotaku:

Fable Legends is one of those games that doesn’t quite make sense until you get your hands on it. Fable is such an intrinsically single-player experience for a lot of us that imagining it as a co-op action game requires some mental gymnastics. Once I had a controller in my hands and four other people around me, though, I was pleasantly surprised by how well it works. A four-player arena combat game might not sound much like Fable, but its fairytale artistic direction, humour and good-natured sense of fun scream Fable with every breath. It’s Fable meets Dungeon Keeper, essentially…

Lionhead has made a fun game, here, but one that relies entirely on groups of players bothering to make the most of it…

I wasn’t convinced that Fable Legends would work. It’s based entirely around combat, after all, and I don’t think you’d find many people who thought that the combat was the best thing about Fable. But Legends’ combat is almost unrecognisable, entirely rebuilt around the idea of co-op, and meanwhile the things that were already great about Fable are here too: the lush green forests and tumbledown towns and spooky ruins of Albion, the characterful dialogue and personality, the fairytale ambience. Perhaps it’s because I wasn’t entirely expecting it to already be fun at this early stage, but I’m impressed by how well it’s coming together.

 

Polygon:

While the studio appears to be taking its influence from the reams of successful free-to-play multiplayer companies, the likes of which include Riot Games, its design tactics are unlike traditional multiplayer. Lionhead is adopting what the company is calling asymmetrical design. The developer is combining co-operative and competitive play by putting one player in the role of the villain, while the remaining four players work together to bypass bombs, enemy NPCs, and other tactics deployed by that villain character. As a result, no one game is the same and players have the autonomy to win a game based on making their own independent plays in a single match.

Check out the Fable Legends website for more information on the game and to sign up to the free Beta! I will see you in the world of Albion whilst we fight the Villain!

 

Kinect And Wii U GamePad Detract Or Add To The Experience?

Rob Fahey has written a brilliant article on GameIndustry.biz about why he thinks the Xbox One and Nintendo Wii U are actually worse off with their true next-gen innovations in Kinect and the GamePad.

Xbox One and Wii U are less conservative, because both of them make some effort to change the interface and context of videogames. Xbox One includes a vastly updated and improved Kinect motion sensor, which shoulders the brunt of the blame for the console’s inflated price tag. The sensor, like its predecessor, is designed to map and understand the movement of human bodies around the room in front of it – unlike its predecessor, it actually appears to be capable of doing so very well. The Wii U, meanwhile, includes the GamePad, a touchscreen controller that lets you play games even while others are watching something else on TV, but more interestingly, also creates a second screen for gameplay and has potential uses in asymmetric multiplayer, wherein one player uses the screen to set up a game while others use Wii Remotes to tackle the challenges being created.

It could be, of course, that the features themselves just aren’t much good. I think the potential of the GamePad remains to be tapped, but have some sympathy with the argument that Kinect, even in its vastly upgraded Xbox One incarnation, is a solution for which no readily apparent problem can be found. Certainly its present function, as an utterly sub-par way of controlling the console’s menu functions and an occasional shoehorned annoyance in games, does little to explain why this expensive piece of hardware is a mandatory part of Xbox One – yet I know that there are plenty of enthusiastic and intelligent games people at Microsoft, and there must be a genuine belief that Kinect 2 can deliver unique and worthwhile experiences that won’t be possible on other consoles. The problem is that, just as with the thus-far largely meaningless GamePad, Microsoft has failed to demonstrate or articulate just what those experiences will be.

It feels like both companies want to bottle some of the magic which fuelled the Wii to such great heights in the last generation, but they’ve forgotten that the real magic of the Wii wasn’t actually the Wiimote – it was Wii Sports. In one superbly crafted game, bundled free with the console in many territories, Nintendo explained exactly what the Wii was for. A few minutes with Wii Sports showed anyone and everyone what the Wiimote was designed to do and how it would change the game experience. Moreover, it set out a clear agenda for the console as a whole – a social machine, a family machine, an accessible machine. Wii Sports wasn’t just a game, it was a powerful demonstration, a mission statement and perhaps the greatest piece of marketing anyone in the games industry has ever crafted.

The Xbox One and the Wii U both have their Wiimote, but neither has their Wii Sports.

The last sentence that I highlighted in bold is really the key point in the article to me. Both devices have potential, and I have always been a supporter of the Kinect, but neither have a true stand-out game which fulfils some of the potential of either device yet. Obviously it is still very early days with the Xbox One, with Kinect-focused games like Kinect Sports Rivals coming out soon, but you would have hoped that Nintendo would have a killer game that utilises the GamePad properly by now.

Check out the full article over on GamesIndustry.biz.