Most Amazing RPG Character Customisation Tool

This character customisation/creation tool for Black Desert is mind-blowing! It would be amazing to play an MMORPG with all of the massively varied characters such as this.

The trailer for the game is pretty cool as well:

Check out the website for the game here.

Advertisements

How The SNES Rendered Special Effects

This great little video from Did You Know Gaming explains how the 16-bit SNES managed to display some amazing effects that allowed the console to keep up with 32-bit consoles. The Mode 7 chip is pretty well known but it’s nice to hear some more information about it and other chips they used in the cartridges.

Unreal Engine 4 Released!

unrealengine4

 

Epic has released the amazing Unreal Engine 4 so you can now download it today and harness the amazing power of the engine and enjoy the fun I get to have every day using it on Fable Legends! 🙂

It costs $20 a month which includes the full engine, not the restricted version that was previously available in UDK from UE3, and full support which is very good value if you consider the price of most art/graphics programs these days!

Check out their website and join in the fun!

Kinect And Wii U GamePad Detract Or Add To The Experience?

Rob Fahey has written a brilliant article on GameIndustry.biz about why he thinks the Xbox One and Nintendo Wii U are actually worse off with their true next-gen innovations in Kinect and the GamePad.

Xbox One and Wii U are less conservative, because both of them make some effort to change the interface and context of videogames. Xbox One includes a vastly updated and improved Kinect motion sensor, which shoulders the brunt of the blame for the console’s inflated price tag. The sensor, like its predecessor, is designed to map and understand the movement of human bodies around the room in front of it – unlike its predecessor, it actually appears to be capable of doing so very well. The Wii U, meanwhile, includes the GamePad, a touchscreen controller that lets you play games even while others are watching something else on TV, but more interestingly, also creates a second screen for gameplay and has potential uses in asymmetric multiplayer, wherein one player uses the screen to set up a game while others use Wii Remotes to tackle the challenges being created.

It could be, of course, that the features themselves just aren’t much good. I think the potential of the GamePad remains to be tapped, but have some sympathy with the argument that Kinect, even in its vastly upgraded Xbox One incarnation, is a solution for which no readily apparent problem can be found. Certainly its present function, as an utterly sub-par way of controlling the console’s menu functions and an occasional shoehorned annoyance in games, does little to explain why this expensive piece of hardware is a mandatory part of Xbox One – yet I know that there are plenty of enthusiastic and intelligent games people at Microsoft, and there must be a genuine belief that Kinect 2 can deliver unique and worthwhile experiences that won’t be possible on other consoles. The problem is that, just as with the thus-far largely meaningless GamePad, Microsoft has failed to demonstrate or articulate just what those experiences will be.

It feels like both companies want to bottle some of the magic which fuelled the Wii to such great heights in the last generation, but they’ve forgotten that the real magic of the Wii wasn’t actually the Wiimote – it was Wii Sports. In one superbly crafted game, bundled free with the console in many territories, Nintendo explained exactly what the Wii was for. A few minutes with Wii Sports showed anyone and everyone what the Wiimote was designed to do and how it would change the game experience. Moreover, it set out a clear agenda for the console as a whole – a social machine, a family machine, an accessible machine. Wii Sports wasn’t just a game, it was a powerful demonstration, a mission statement and perhaps the greatest piece of marketing anyone in the games industry has ever crafted.

The Xbox One and the Wii U both have their Wiimote, but neither has their Wii Sports.

The last sentence that I highlighted in bold is really the key point in the article to me. Both devices have potential, and I have always been a supporter of the Kinect, but neither have a true stand-out game which fulfils some of the potential of either device yet. Obviously it is still very early days with the Xbox One, with Kinect-focused games like Kinect Sports Rivals coming out soon, but you would have hoped that Nintendo would have a killer game that utilises the GamePad properly by now.

Check out the full article over on GamesIndustry.biz.